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    Salary due is the amount of salary payable for a particular period but the related services corresponding to the amount of salary payable have already been availed by the business entity. It is also known as salary outstanding. It is a liability for the business entity. Journal Entry for Salary DueRead more

    Salary due is the amount of salary payable for a particular period but the related services corresponding to the amount of salary payable have already been availed by the business entity. It is also known as salary outstanding. It is a liability for the business entity.

    Journal Entry for Salary Due

    Journal entry for salary due/payable can be recorded in the books of accounts using both the golden rule and the modern rule of accounting.

    1. According to the “Golden rules” of accounting

    a. Entry for salary due

    Salary A/c Debit Nominal account Debit all expenses and losses
     To Outstanding Salary A/c Credit Personal account (Representative) Credit the giver

    (Being salary due)

    b. Entry at the time of actual payment of the salary due

    Outstanding Salary A/c Debit Personal account (Representative) Debit the receiver
     To Cash/Bank A/c Credit Real account/Personal account Credit what goes out/Credit the giver

    (Being salary paid)

    2. According to the “Modern rules” of accounting

    a. Entry for salary due

    Salary A/c Debit Expense Debit the increase in expense
     To Outstanding Salary A/c Credit Liability Credit the increase in liability

    (Being salary due)

    b. Entry at the time of actual payment of the salary due

    Outstanding Salary A/c Debit Liability Debit the decrease in liability
     To Cash/Bank A/c Credit Asset Credit the decrease in asset

    Example

    ABC Ltd did not pay salary 100,000 for the month of March 20xx due on 31st March 20xx because of lack of funds. However, they paid the due salary on 25/04/20xx.

    1. Journal entry for salary due on 31/03/20xx

    Salary A/c Debit 100,000 Debit the increase in expense
     To Outstanding Salary A/c Credit  100,000 Credit the increase in liability

    (Being salary due for the month of March 20xx)

    2. Journal entry at the time of payment on 25/04/20xx

    Outstanding Salary A/c Debit 100,000 Debit the decrease in liability
     To Cash/Bank A/c Credit  100,000 Credit the decrease in asset

    (Being salary paid for the month of March 20xx)

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